May 2001

From University of Southern California

dg.o2001 national conference for digital government research

The University of Southern California's Information Sciences Institute (ISI) will host May 21-23 a national conference on making online government systems available to citizens.

The conference, called dg.o2001, is sponsored by the National Science Foundation. Yigal Arens, director of ISI's Intelligent Systems Division, will serve as conference chair, and Eduard Hovy, chief of the ISI Natural Languages Group, as program chair for the event.

The event, officially called dg.o 2001, is expected to draw approximately 150 computer science researchers and representatives of government agencies, e-commerce businesses, the software industry, as well as journalists and members of the public.

Sessions will address using information technology to improve the efficiency and accessibility of government at all levels, including:

  • Government and social policy
  • Privacy and security
  • Delivery and tracking of public services
  • Commercial and economic incentives for Digital Government
  • Useful and user-friendly interfaces, including products for the disabled
  • Multimedia presentations and human-computer interaction
  • Delivery of geospatial, textual, audiovisual, statistical, and other information
  • Delivery of public surveys and data gathering
  • Data integration and statistics
  • Cooperation among federal, state, and local government agencies

According to Arens, besides sessions with panelists, the conference will also include technical and general keynote addresses; research presentations; system demonstrations of new online technologies; poster sessions; and "Birds-of-a-Feather roundtables."

The conference is being presented by the Digital Government Research Center, a joint effort of ISI and the Columbia University Department of Computer Science.

The DGRC was formed to bring together information technology researchers and developers with interests and experience in databases, human-computer interaction, knowledge representation, data mining, and other areas of computer science and information systems.

The event will be free to students.












This article comes from Science Blog. Copyright 2004
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